Hearing protection

A effective hearing conservation program can prevent Hearing loss, improve person’s morale and a general feeling of well-being, increases quality of protection and reduces the incidence of stress related diseases.

Environment that contain equipments which produces potentially hazardous noise should be modified to reduce the noise exposure to acceptable levels.

Sounds are everywhere, at every level. But love it or hate it, high-volume sound can actually damage your hearing!

Beyond 90-95 dB , sustained exposure to loud sounds may result in hearing loss.

Even short exposure to sounds over 125dB can cause permanent damage.

Stand back and take cover.

You can’t avoid every loud noise. But when you know one is coming, do your part to stay safe. Step back from a source like an amplifier or subway. Cover your ears when walking past construction work.

Noise damage can begin at any age, and it tends to accumulate over time.

Sound is measured in units called decibels (dB).Sound less than 75 dB are unlikely to harm hearing . Normal conversation , for instance, measures about 60 dB. A typical hair blow dryer has an intensity of about 85 dB , but if they’re used for just brief periods, they’re unlikely to damage hearing.

If you’re around noises at this level:

  • Turn down the sound.
  • Avoid the noise (walk away).
  • Wear  canal caps.
  • Block the noise (wear ear plugs or earmuffs).
  • Wear inserts.

IF YOU ARE EXPOSED TO NOISE YOU SHOULD USE HEARING PROTECTIVE DEVICES TO ATTENVATE THE NOISE. FOLLOWING PROTECTIVE DEVICES SHOULD BE USED.

An effective hearing protection program is defined to include:-

  • An assessment of noise exposure.
  • Noise abatement and/or administrative controls availability.
  • Annual audiometric test of exposed workers.
  • Use of hearing protectors for exposure equal to or greater than 85 dB, regardless of exposure duration.